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The Bradbury Committee (1928)
 
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In 1926, the Chancellor of the Exchequer (Winston Churchill) appointed a committee to consider whether it was desirable to permit a further extension of Municipal Savings Banks, and if so, within what limits and subject to what conditions, statutory or otherwise. The Chairman of the Committee was Lord Bradbury, and the composition of the Committee was detailed in a Minute of Appointment dated September 28th 1926. The report was produced in January 1928.

Lord Bradbury (1872-1950) was Secretary to the Treasury (1913-1919), and later principal British representative on the First World War Reparations Commission in Paris. He filled many important posts in the financial world, and undertook many investigations on behalf of the Government; but was perhaps better known to the public in connection with the issue of Treasury 1 and 10/- notes in 1914 ("Bradbury's") that bore his signature.
 
The conclusion of the Bradbury Committee was that "in view of the present position of national finance the extension of municipal savings banks within the next ten years would not be in the interests of the community as a whole". The full report of the Committee is reproduced below.
 
The Bank's input to the Committee was described by J P Hilton in his book Britain's First Municipal Bank, and the published Report was discussed by the City Council on June 12th 1928. An article by J P Hilton (The Case for Municipal Banks) was published by The Banker magazine in March 1928.
committee
The BIRMINGHAM MUNICIPAL BANK
Existing Facilities for Thrift
PART II - CRITICAL
Disadvantages of Municipal Banks
PART III - SUBSIDIARY OBSERVATIONS
Summary of Conclusions
 
Report Sections
 
 
History